Gardening is also possible where only concrete grows all around – in the middle of the city. We present the latest and most beautiful things for your green island at home, including tips from the annabelle editorial team.

annabelle photographer Karin Heer about her balcony paradise:
“I love perennial plants. Ivy, climbing plants, lavender, roses, boxwood: they are also green in winter, and I don’t have to replant everything every spring, but can supplement the stock with flowers and herbs. Ivy is a good beginner’s plant, it grows quickly, wraps easily around railings and gives an enchanted touch. Buy pots too big, the plant can grow faster and dries out less. Since there are not enough nutrients in clay pots, I add long-term fertilizer to each pot in spring. It lasts about three months, and the plant can take as many nutrients as it needs.”

Beautiful accessories for the balcony oasis:
1 Sunshade Ramsö 9.95 Fr. from Ikea
2 tray Vegetable Tree by Josef Frank ca. 73 Fr. at Svenskt Tenn
3 sofa Springtime with tent by Jean-Marie Massaud for B&B Italia, price on request
4 Wasp trap Sunflower ceramic approx. 25 Fr. from Sagaform
5 Watering can Gadera 12.90 Fr. of Fly
6 bowls Splash 8.50 Fr. by Pfister

7 armchairs Pavo Real ca. 2100 Fr. by Patricia Urquiola for Driade
8 lanterns Bandol each ca. 24 Fr. by Gunther Lambert
9 Chain of Lights Solvinden 19.95 Fr. of Ikea
10 Propagator greenhouse approx. 30 Fr. from Manufactum
11 Flowerpot from Pantone from 4.90 Fr. to 129 Fr. at Globus, various colors

“I have many wild plants, such as mallows, whose seeds have been blown by the wind. I have also planted wild flowers and medicinal plants: Bellflowers, hawkweed and St. John’s wort, goji berry bushes – all perennial. It smells beguilingly of great datura, broom and lilac. Good beginner plants are lavender, olive trees and cherry tomatoes. Never again will I remove supposedly dead leaves and branches from my clematis in spring. Because they are often still completely intact inside and turn green again.”

Vivian Scheifele, secretariat annabelle, about her green terrace

Florina Schwander, editor of annabelle Online, about her indoor plant kingdom
“Every plant has its history. Some of them have been with me for more than a decade through different cities and loved ones, they are a kind of constant in my life and yet continue to develop independently of me. Good beginner plants are nettle plants or grasses: they light up when they’re thirsty and recover immediately when you water them. Most plants, especially succulents, prefer too little to too much water! With indoor plants, it is important that they stand optimally: Those that need a lot of light should be as close as possible to the window, every centimetre counts.

On the next page you will find book tips and addresses for community gardens in Switzerland.

“I have many wild plants, such as mallows, whose seeds have been blown by the wind. I have also planted wild flowers and medicinal plants: Bellflowers, hawkweed and St. John’s wort, goji berry bushes – all perennial. It smells beguilingly of great datura, broom and lilac. Good beginner plants are lavender, olive trees and cherry tomatoes. Never again will I remove supposedly dead leaves and branches from my clematis in spring. Because they are often still completely intact inside and turn green again.”

Florina Schwander, editor of annabelle Online, about her indoor plant kingdom

“Every plant has its history. Some of them have been with me for more than a decade through different cities and loved ones, they are a kind of constant in my life and yet continue to develop independently of me. Good beginner plants are nettle plants or grasses: they light up when they’re thirsty and recover immediately when you water them. Most plants, especially succulents, prefer too little to too much water! With indoor plants, it is important that they stand optimally: Those that need a lot of light should be as close as possible to the window, every centimetre counts.

On the next page you will find book tips and addresses for community gardens in Switzerland.

seed bombs
She spent the first years of her life living in a bus and playing around with her parents and four siblings throughout world history. Josie Jeffery is a real hippie girl. It’s no wonder she’s making seed bombs and putting them to use in dreary places. In her new book, Josie describes how to make the little balls of soil and seeds, which plants are suitable for them, and what to look out for if you want to make the city blossom.

organic balcony garden
If you want to be absolutely sure that where there is organic, there is also organic in it, it is best to plant it yourself. You don’t even need a garden, says Andrea Heistinger, an agricultural scientist. She describes in an extensive volume how vegetables, fruit and herbs can also thrive on balconies, terraces and in backyards. The practical tips and instructions are supplemented by portraits of urban kitchen gardens all over Europe.

Mini Gardens
What to do with the tiny spot of green or gravel behind the house, which would hardly deserve the name garden? Redesign of course! The author Hanneke Louwerse shows how. Using numerous case studies and generous pictures, she describes and explains how small gardens look best and provides tips and tricks on ideal plants, colours, shapes and materials.

flower world
He who keeps his eyes open, sees: The world is blooming! And not only in the country, in large gardens or city parks, no also on walls and in backyards, on theatre stages, on fabrics, crockery or in painting. The designer Julia Kaergel has collected colourful flower pictures on her travels and looked for flower motifs, which she has photographed, illustrated or painted and now compiled into a picture book.

Forgotten classics
You know what bulbous genius is? Probably not. But when properly prepared, it tastes very tasty. Knollenziest is an old type of vegetable that hardly anyone remembers. The cook Kathleen and the natural scientist Yves Paccalet find “wrongly” and put more than 50 forgotten vegetable classics in the centre of their new book. She reveals how to prepare the old roots, tubers and leaves in the most tasty way and gives tips on their cultivation and storage.

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